A VERY LARGE AND RARE MARQUETRY PANEL AND FRAME SIGNED BY FRANCESCO ABBIATI DEPICTING THE ASCENT TO CALVARY

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

This magnificent inlaid panel, being the tenth known signed work by Francesco Abbiati (fl. c. 1780-c. 1828), is an important addition to the known oeuvre of this Lombard-born intarsiatore, who was active in Rome in the last twenty years of the eighteenth century.

An Unusual Pair of Carved Birds Eye Maple Aesthetic Period Armchairs, Possibly by Pottier & Stymus

Carlton Hobbs LLC Pottier Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

This unusual pair of armchairs , circa 1870, is an example of Aesthetic movement design of the 1870s and 1880s, which “emphasized art in the production of furniture, metalwork, ceramics, stained glass, textiles, wallpapers, and books.” Common characteristics in Aesthetic furnishings during this period were exotic ornament, motifs featuring elements found in nature, and decorative inlays and gilt highlights. At this time New York “was considered the style center of America,” and one firm who enjoyed great success in this genre was Pottier & Stymus.

Carlton Hobbs LLC, detail.

Carlton Hobbs LLC, detail.

A Spectacular Pair of Minton Majolica Jardinieres on Elephant-Form Tripod Pedestals, with Decoration Designed by Christopher Dresser

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

In the last decade of the 18th century, several events transpired which changed the face of the English pottery industry. The death of leading industrialist Josiah Wedgwood in 1795 marked the end of his firm’s domination in the field, making room for a new market leader. Additionally, Josiah Spode II, who had taken over the Spode company upon his father’s death in 1797, successfully developed and marketed bone china, a material that “was to supersede all the variants of soft paste and hard paste wares developed in the eighteenth century.”1 It was also around 1796 that Thomas Minton founded his eponymous workshop.

Our Newest Acquisition Only Lasted ‘Til Dessert

Carlton Hobbs cake 1

 

 

A Rare Confectioner’s Scale Model of the Parthenon Temple at the Acropolis, Athens

New York City. September 23rd, 2014.

LES TIRAILLEURS ALGERIENS

This near-life size 19th century hand-colored lithograph depicts a Tirailleur Algérian (Algerian sharphooter), a light infantryman of the Armée d’Afrique, which was developed by the French during the colonization of North Africa.

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

The tirailleurs were officially created under the Second Empire in 1855 and were predominantly made up of native servicemen. The soldiers wore Zouave-style uniforms refered to as tenue oriental (Oriental dress), which comprised a blue jacket with yellow braiding worn over a sleeveless vest, blue harem trousers, a red sash at the waist and a fez or turban worn on the head. Algerian tirailleurs served in the Crimean war, the Second Italian War of Independence, the second Franco-Mexican war, and the Franco-Prussian War, as well as colonial campaigns in North Africa. They acquired the nickname Turcos (Turks) during the Crimean war, by which they were widely known over the following century. Figure 1 depicts a late 19th century photograph of a group of Tirailleur Algérians. 

A FINE AND LARGE SPECIMEN MARBLE AND HARDSTONE TABLE TOP CENTERED BY AN ARMORIAL MICROMOSAIC RONDEL, POSSIBLY BY VINCENZO RAFAELLI

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

The present tabletop is a particularly fine example of the superlative effect created by the combination of fine stone inlay and micromosaic.  Although both techniques are associated with Roman workshops, it is not until the mid nineteenth century that they are combined on tabletops, and even then such examples remain rare. It has been posited that this top could be the work of Vincenzo Raffaelli (1783-1865), son of the most famous Roman worker of micro-mosaics, Giacomo Raffaelli, who is credited with taking the art form to renewed levels of complexity in the late-eighteenth century, carefully refining the range of colors and decreasing the size of the minute tiles (tessarae) used. Hot enamel of varied color, was pulled to form long strands and then cut into tiny pieces to make tesserae of the kind seen in the central panel of the present piece. The most complex works in micromosaic contained “more than 5,000 tesserae per square inch” and would take several years to complete. Although Giacomo died in 1836, Vincenzo continued his father’s workshop successfully into the mid nineteenth century, the period from which the present tabletop dates.

Hangings Ahead Of Their Time

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

This extraordinary pair of hangings, with unusual stylized orange tree and sunflower pattern, evoke the Aesthetic movement of the late 19th century. However, after close technical inspection, curatorial opinion has clarified almost beyond doubt that they are, in reality, from the early eighteenth century and possibly of Genoese manufacture.

A Park Landscape by Jan Van Bunnick

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

An Exceptional Cabinet From a One-of-a-Kind Furniture Suite

Carlton Hobbs Chifflot a

Carlton Hobbs LLC

The present cabinet belongs to the only known suite of furniture produced by the French craftsman named Chifflot. All the pieces are signed and dated, including the cabinet, which was made in 1846-47. A related armoire, 1848 (figure 1), was sold in the art trade 2001; a bedside cabinet, 1853 (figure 2), and dressing table, 1859 (figure 3), were sold in 2002; an; and a day bed, 1853, is currently in the art trade.

Figure 1

Figure 1

Acting Of Themselves—A Musical Automaton Clock with Tightrope-Walker and Musicians in the ‘Turquerie’ Taste

Carlton Hobbs LLC

Carlton Hobbs LLC

The present automaton clock, made in France in the second quarter of the 19th century, contains as its main spectacle a remarkable mechanical group comprised of a Turkish acrobat and musicians, designed to imitate human movements, in this case on a miniature scale. It is all the more remarkable for the fact that the substantial base is beautifully inlaid with references to the Turkish and Islamic world, and we know of no other examples of automata that incorporate this conceit.